5 House Styles for You to Consider

5 Popular Types of Houses (with Photos)

Cape Cod Style House

In the literary classic The Fountainhead, the architect and main character Howard Roark states, “A building is alive. Its integrity is to follow its own truth, its one single theme, and to serve its own single purpose and its maker gives it the soul and every wall, window, and stairway to express it.”

In the 1949 movie version, Gary Cooper delivers that line with great passion. Likewise, the type of house you purchase will ideally reflect your individual tastes and personality.

There are countless styles of houses out there from the sun-soaked adobe structures of Santa Fe to the pastel homes of Charleston, South Carolina’s “Rainbow Row.” Let’s take a look at some classic architecture ideas to help get you inspired.

 

1. Cape Cod

This style dates all the way back to the 17th century though became popularized in the 1930s. Cape Cods are typically one-story and feature a central front door, two symmetrical multi-pane windows and hardwood floors. The steep roofs were designed to minimize the weight of New England snow settling on the roof. The characteristic low ceilings were meant to conserve heat and the signature shutters were put in place to block harsh winter winds. The Cape Cod-style is not very big so you may require an addition on the side or around the back.

According to HGTV, the style was on the wane until Boston architect Royal Barry Willis reintroduced the Cape in the 1920s as a contemporary housing option. He retained the basic exterior shape of a Cape, however, adapted the interior for modern living. 

 

2. ColonialColonial Style House

This style dates to the late 19th Century and is one of the most popular styles in the country. Colonial-style homes typically have two or three stories, fireplaces, and a brick or wood facade. The classic Colonial has the kitchen and living room on the first floor and the bedrooms on the second floor. Colonials are among the easiest houses to add on to. 

According to SFGate, As Colonial architecture evolved in the United States, architects and homeowners added their own unique takes on the style. This included “items such as brass door knockers, cut-glass doorknobs, and gilt indoor mirrors. The use of shutters on the front windows also evolved out of the Colonial-style.”

 

3. VictorianColonial Style House

The “Victorian Era” lasted roughly from 1860 to 1900. Perhaps the most well-known within the Victorian style is the “Queen Anne.” Contemporary Victorian house design is traditional but implements and combines more modern fabrics and colors. Victorian homes typically have a steeply pitched roof, a gable that faces front, patterned shingles, bay windows, and an asymmetrical facade with a partial front porch. Louisville, Kentucky boasts the highest number of Victorian-style homes in the U.S. and the mansions originally built in the 1870s in “Old Louisville” have been almost entirely preserved.

 

4. Tudor

The name derives from timber-framed cottages built during the 16th-century Tudor dynasty in England; however, today’s Tudor houses are modern-day takes on a variety of late Medieval English prototypes. Tudor-style homes typically include a steeply pitched roof, cross gables, half-timbering, and narrow windows with small windowpanes.

According to Bob Villa, most of the original, large Tudor houses were built in the Northeast and the Midwest and many have been restored in recent years.

 

 

 

5. Cottage Cottage Style House

Although styles of the English countryside provide the original inspiration, the cozy cottage-style houses that we’re familiar with have unique American accents. They began to become prevalent during the last century in the 20s and 30s though they are similar in design to the modern-day Craftsman-style.

Cottage-style houses include steep roof pitches and cross gables, arched doors, casement windows with small panes, and brick, stone, or stucco siding. This style was originally prevalent in the Northeast, however, searches on travel sites such as Airbnb and Vrbo feature cottage-style homes across the entire country.

How Much House Can I Afford?

No matter what style you decide on, knowing how much house you can afford is always a good idea before embarking on your search. Newrez can help you get into your dream home. Use our mortgage calculator to estimate how much home you could buy and get your mortgage process started by contacting one of our Loan Advisors.